Cover: Syndic No. 11
Syndic Literary Journal

Artwork: Mixed-Media Sculpture “Celtic Cross Series” by Séamus O’Dubsláine

Séamus at Arlington Cemetery

Mixed-Media Sculptor Séamus Ó Dubsláine

Celtic Cross Series

by Séamus Ó Dubsláine

Background

Séamus Ó Dubsláine is creating a series inspired by the “Celtic” Cross,

a beautiful and symbolic icon used for centuries to mythologize a culture.

Using the “Celtic” Cross as a touchstone, he reaches back through his own ancestry

and the works of James Joyce.

Several of Séamus’ ancestors left Ireland early in the seventeen hundreds

due to land confiscations there,

and still others left during the “famine” of the 1840’s.

El Paso Del Norte

El Paso Del Norte

” El Paso Del Norte ” Reclaimed pine wood, copper tube and found cast iron. 19 x 30 x 6 (2010)

Hibernia

Hibernia

” Hibernia ” Reclaimed Christmas tree stands, copper tube, solid brass knobs, wire, bead chain and screws, chromed brass faucet, molded plaster piece, pint size beer glass, burlap, linen fringe and iron eye-bolt. 19 x 30 x 15 (1995)

Please Do Not Call Me Darling

Please Don't Call Me Darling

” Please Do Not Call Me Darling ” Reclaimed pine wood, natural stain, found brass figure and porcelain. 30 x 19 x 6 (1998)

One Crucible

One Crucible 2

” One Crucible ” Reclaimed Christmas tree stands, gold colored epoxy paint, copper wire, old barbed wire, and solid brass knobs. 19 x 28 x 4 (1996)

Las Vegas, New Mexico And The Santa Fe Railroad

Las Vegas, New Mexico and the Santa Fe Railroad

” Las Vegas, New Mexico and the Santa Fe Railroad ” Reclaimed Black Oak wood, copper tubing, vintage Seth Thomas mantle clock, scale model trestle, ties, steel rails, Lionel model locomotive . . . 30 x 48 x 10 (2014)

(And Detail)

Santa Fe RR detail

Authors/Artists Bios

Séamus Ó Dubsláine is creating a series inspired by the "Celtic" Cross, a beautiful and symbolic icon used for centuries to mythologize a culture. Using the “Celtic” Cross as a touchstone, he reaches back through his own ancestry and the works of James Joyce. Several of Séamus' ancestors left Ireland early in the seventeen hundreds due to land confiscations there, and still others left during the “famine” of the 1840’s.
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